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Frequently Asked Questions

You have questions and we have answers. Please select a job title below to view some of the common questions for that position. Don't forget, you can also send us a message here, or you can chat with us by clicking the chat button at the corner of your screen. 

Deputy FAQs

How do I become a Deputy?

There are two routes you can take to become an EDSO deputy. Click here to learn more. 

How many positions are available?

This number fluctuates all of the time. We hire continuously and rarely have zero vacancies. 

Will EDSO sponsor me through an academy?

EDSO can only sponsor current EDSO employees as a promotional/paid position. If you are currently enrolled in an academy, we will accept your application and can offer a conditional agreement to hire you upon graduation. To learn more about the types of academies that best fit your needs, click here. Please check the following list of POST academies to find one near you and inquire about enrolling as a non-affiliated recruit. 

Is there a physical ability test?

No. Academy graduates receive the physical ability as part of the academy. The test is waived for lateral applicants. However, there is a physical ability exam for any current employee seeking a DS-1 (academy trainee) position.

How long does the hiring process take?

This depends on many factors including some outside of our control. Background investigations can be a short as two months! The more thorough and honest you are in the process, the faster the process goes. Leaving sections of the personal history blank may result in delays. 

Can I go on a ride-along?

Yes! Click here to download the Ride-Along application. Please fill out every box and don't forget to sign it. Please indicate that you are a "potential applicant" somewhere on the form. Once it's ready, email the form to our technician as CSOMail@edso.org.

What is the probation period?

18 months.

What is the work schedule like?

Deputies work 12-hour shifts: 3 days on with 4 days off followed by 4 days on with 3 days off. They work 7 shifts for a total of 80 hours in a 2-week pay period. One of the seven shifts will be an 8-hour shift. The shifts are divided into four teams. Team 1 (day) and Team 3 (night) work Tues, Wed, Thurs, and every other Friday. Team 2 (day) and Team 4 (Night) work Sat, Sun, Mon, and every other Friday. There are four "watches" per shift. Adam 0600-1800, Boy 0800-2000, Charles 1600-0400, and Edward 1800-0600. The shifts are bid upon twice a year based on seniority. 

Do EDSO deputies work in the jails or the courts?

EDSO hires correctional officers to work in the jails. Deputies will not work the jails. However, bailiffs are sworn deputies. There are several bailiff vacancies which are occasionally filled by rotating deputies from patrol. 

Do I have to work in Tahoe?

EDSO has two stations. One in Placerville and one in S. Lake Tahoe. There are currently not enough deputies who work in Tahoe permanently. Therefore, there is a rotation of approximately three positions that must be filled. Upon completing probation in Placerville, the least senior deputies will be assigned to Tahoe until they are relieved by deputies with less seniority to take their place. This commitment usually lasts between 1 and 9 months. If you want to work in Tahoe permanently, there are openings and financial incentives to do so.

Is there a take-home car program?

Yes! If you live in EDC, you can take your patrol vehicle home each day. At the end of the week, you leave the vehicle at work for your partner on the opposite side of the week. Most shifts begin and end while in your driveway.

Is there a wellness program?

Yes! Deputies are afforded 3 hours per week to workout on-duty in our new state-of-the-art gym. Aside from the numerous support systems we have in place such as Thrive, Peer Support, and Chaplaincy, we also just created a mental wellness app filled with useful tools. Your wellbeing is at the top of our priorities.

What is the EDSO Field Training Program like?

All FTO Programs are challenging. POST dictates much of what is required. At EDSO, it is our job to get you to pass the program. We will do everything in our power to give you the opportunity to succeed. However, this does not mean every deputy trainee is successful. More than 80% of our trainees complete the FTO Program! Deputies receive four phases of training, typically with 3-4 different trainers. New deputies get 2 weeks of orientation followed by 22 weeks of field training. Lateral deputies can complete FTO in as little as 10 weeks including 2 weeks of orientation. Chat with us if you want to know more about the training!

How does retirement work for new and lateral deputies?

EDSO is a CalPERS agency. If you are a new law enforcement deputy, you will receive a 2.7%@57 retirement. If you are already a law enforcement officer with a 3%@50 (classic member) you will come in at 2%@50. This increases 0.1% every year past 50 with a maximum of 2.7@57. These figures were a result of the 2013 California pension reform (PEPRA). We cannot match a pre-existing 3%@50. You will maintain rights to your previously vested time with your previous employer. Please click here to see whether your current agency has reciprocity with CalPERS. 

I still have questions. Who should I talk to? 

Click on the yellow chat icon in the corner of the page or click here to send our recruiters an after-hours message. 

Correctional Officer FAQs

How many positions are available?

This number fluctuates all of the time. We hire continuously and rarely have zero vacancies. 

How long is the pre-employment process?

Depending on the position and number of vacancies, It can take two to three months or more to get from date of application to date of hire. This is dependent on how fast applicants get through the recruitment and background processes. Applicants who are prompt with all tasks tend to get through faster. 

Is there a physical ability test?

Yes. The Correctional Officer test is a one minute timed obstacle course performed on concrete floors. There are cone obstacles and barriers requiring you crawl, zig-zag, and sprint. It concludes with an 80-foot drag of a 165 pound dummy, all completed while wearing an SCBA tank. 

How should I prepare for the physical ability test?

Start TODAY! Don’t wait. The test is challenging but designed for success. Candidates who arrive prepared for physical exertion tend to do very well. Ballistic exercises that challenge your cardiovascular and respiratory system are advised. Calisthenics, burpees, intervals, sprints, and other cardio will help you prepare.

Most of the unsuccessful candidates struggled with the dummy drag. Dragging 165 pounds of dead weight is a challenge. Training quadriceps would likely benefit you. Squats, deadlifts, lunges, and stairs will help you prepare. Of course, there is a trick to everything. Dragging the dummy is best accomplished by leaning back and pushing off one foot at a time. Once you gain momentum, maintain it. Stopping and starting wastes valuable energy.

Eat complex carbohydrates the night before and a light, healthy, balanced meal in the morning. Drink one or two glasses of water in the morning. Come to the test with a can-do attitude. Warm up on your own then stretch to prevent injury. If you follow this advice, you will be in the optimal position to succeed. Don’t forget, cheer on the other candidates! We are all in this together.

What should I wear to the physical ability test?

Wear comfortable and professional fitness gear and athletic shoes with good grip. Long sleeves and athletic pants may provide protection from the course.

What is the probation period?

18 months.

What is the work schedule like?

Officers work four days on, followed by three days off. The next week, they work three days on and get four days off. They work six, 12.2 hour shifts and one, 6.5 hour shift for a total of 80 hours a pay period (2 weeks). Fridays alternate. For example, a typical weekend/graveyard schedule looks like this: Fri, Sat, Sun, Mon: 1800 - 0615 followed by Sat, Sun 1800 - 0615 and Mon 1800 - 0030.

Do I choose which jail I work in?

EDSO has two jails. One in Placerville and one in S. Lake Tahoe. There are several positions in Tahoe patrol that are not filled. Therefore, we may rotate officers to Tahoe fill those positions until such time as a less senior officer can take his/her place. Likewise, there are occasional incidents which may require you to temporarily change worksites. However, you will generally work in the location of your choice.

What is the Jail Training Program like?

The JTO program is approximately 12 weeks of training in the Placerville Jail covering all aspects of the position. There is a training manual that you will study from with your assigned JTO. Sometime after you complete the training program, you will be sent to a 196 hour corrections academy. The purpose of the program is to pass you. We intend to give you every opportunity to succeed. Unfortunately, not everyone does. The good news is EDSO has a very high success rate. You will be studying a manual, taking exams, and receiving observation reports. If you transfer to the Tahoe Jail, you will receive an additional 2-week orientation. 

What is the Corrections Academy like?

The academy is about 6-weeks long and held at a training facility. More recently, our officers attended the Sonoma, CA academy. You will be scheduled to attend the academy after you complete your jail training but prior to your one-year anniversary of employment. Click here to learn about the BSCC STC Core Course Academy.

Is this job dangerous?

Any job in law enforcement comes with danger. However, we equip you with the training and equipment to keep you safe. Corrections is a challenging career but a rewarding one. While every inmate is unpredictable, nearly all serve their time without incident. Many of them resolve to better themselves and will look to you to help them. Many officers find the rehabilitation part of corrections to be very rewarding. Due to our strict policies and practices regarding rule and law enforcement, there are even fewer incidents in our facilities.

I still have questions. Who should I talk to? 

Click on the yellow chat icon in the corner of the page or click here to send our recruiters an after-hours message. 

Dispatcher FAQs

How many positions are available?

This number fluctuates all of the time. We hire continuously and rarely have zero vacancies. 

How long does the pre-employment process take?

Depending on the position and number of vacancies, It can take two to three months or more to get from date of application to date of hire. This is dependent on how fast applicants get through the recruitment and background processes. Applicants who are prompt with all tasks tend to get through faster.

Do dispatchers work in Tahoe?

No. All dispatching is done from our Public Safety Facility in Placerville. 

Can I go on a sit-along?

Yes! Click here to download the Ride-Along application. Please fill out every box and don't forget to sign it. Please indicate that you are a "potential applicant" somewhere on the form. Once it's ready, email the form to our technician as CSOMail@edso.org​.

What is the training like?

Most dispatchers start their careers without relative experience. Dispatching is a highly specialized job and takes a long time to adjust. Our training program takes about one year to complete because we make sure you receive in-depth and comprehensive training to ensure your success. The program starts off slow. Typically, trainees will listen and watch as their training answers calls and gets familiar with the systems, policies, and procedures. Dispatchers get hand's-on experience by taking calls for service. Eventually they move into the dispatching portion in which they communicate and coordinate with deputies and other resources. There is someone there every step of the way to teach you the position.​

Is the training program hard?

Learning any new job can be intimidating. Dispatching is highly specialized and deals with critical incidents which makes the training fairly strenuous. However, the training is steady and lasts about one year. You will receive weekly evaluations to keep you on track. 

What is the probation period?

18 months.

What is the work schedule like?

Dispatchers work four days a week with three days off. Three of these shifts are 12 hours long. The fourth day is 4 hours long. Here is a sample schedule:

Week 1: Sun, Mon, Tues 0700-1900 and Wed 0700-1100. Week 2: Sun, Mon, Tues 0700-1900 and Wed 0700-1100.

Do dispatchers work nights and weekends?

Yes. Any emergency operation must work 24/7/365. Dispatch is no exception. Regardless of your shift preference, these positions are assigned as needed. Seniority decides who gets the first choice in shift. You should anticipate working nights, weekends, holidays, and other days of personal significance. 

Is Dispatching Stressful?

It can be. However, the vast majority of calls are non-emergency. We train you to handle the stressful calls and, with some experience, you will be able to handle it all. 

What's the hardest part of the job?

Learning to listen to frequent radio traffic is challenging. It is a learned skill that most pick up after awhile. You can practice this skill by listening to a public safety radio scanner throughout your day and see if you can listen AND comprehend everything you've heard.

How do dispatchers stay calm?

It's really a matter of training and experience. You will find what works best for you. For many, the dedication to service and the focus of their expertise is enough to work though stressful situations. Knowing that your deputies and fellow citizens depend on you gives you drive to succeed. Dispatching is a team effort. You are never alone in the room and will have a knowledgeable team.

Why do people chose to be dispatchers?

It's a job you can be proud of. You will be specially trained to handle critical incidents. It's a job where you can demonstrate your courage and ability. You can make a big difference in the lives of people around you. Dispatchers save lives. It's a fact. We call those people heroes.

What's the best part of the job?

  1. Supporting the law enforcement process. Dispatchers are of incredible importance to the process. You have a lot of responsibilities but you also share in the victory. If you truly want to help people and be part of the criminal justice process, this is a great job for you.

  2. It's exciting. EDSO dispatchers experience a large spectrum of call types. Not many other agencies have some of our call types. From search and rescue operations to boat stops and everything in between, every day will bring you a new experience.

I still have questions. Who should I talk to? 

Click on the yellow chat icon in the corner of the page or click here to send our recruiters an after-hours message. 

Sheriff's Technician FAQs

How many positions are available?

This number fluctuates all of the time. We hire continuously and rarely have zero vacancies. 

How long does the pre-employment process take?

Depending on the position and number of vacancies, It can take two to three months or more to get from date of application to date of hire. This is dependent on how fast applicants get through the recruitment and background processes. Applicants who are prompt with all tasks tend to get through faster.

Do Sheriff's Techs work in Placerville and Tahoe?

Yes. There are positions in both areas. There are currently additional vacancies in Tahoe. Applicants willing to work in Tahoe are highly desired. 

What is the work schedule like?

Sheriff's Techs work a variety of specialties and a variety of schedules as well. Some are 4 days a week with 10-hour shifts, and others work 5 days a week with 8-hour shifts. There are shifts that cover days, nights, and weekends. These schedules are assigned as-needed and cannot be requested.

What is the probation period?

18 months.

What can I expect from the training process?

You will be directly supervised by a senior technician. You will be provided assistance as you gradually become more independent. Once you have become independent, you may become a Sheriff's Technician II. 

Why do people chose to be Sheriff's Technicians?

It's a job you can be proud of. If you ever wanted to work in law enforcement, this is a good way to do so in a clerical way! With that said, this position varies greatly depending on your assignment and there are opportunities to change responsibilities and learn new things. 

What's the best part of the job?

Many Sheriff's Techs cite "contributing to the law enforcement process" as the best part. Clerical work is extra rewarding when you are working in law enforcement. There is a lot of added access and responsibilities that add value to your position.​

I still have questions. Who should I talk to? 

Click on the yellow chat icon in the corner of the page or click here to send our recruiters an after-hours message.